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Part 15 (Advanced Configuration Options III)
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Sample Configurations:     The configurations below are meant as general examples and guidelines. If you are not certain as to the approach you want to take, be sure to either to primarily rely on tagging or use a DeadLetter mailbox for blocked mail to avoid false positives.
Scenario One: Corporate LAN
Scenario Two: Separate JSpamFilter machine
Scenario Three: Aggressive Filtering
Scenario Four: Refuse Connections from DNSBL-Listed Servers and Send All Other Suspicious Mail to a Dead Letter Mailbox:

This could be handy.

Scenario One: Corporate LAN

In this scenario, all of the corporate users are on an internal (firewalled) network, with IP addresses in the 10.x.x.x block reserved for use behind firewalls. The domains that recieve mail are "example.com", "support.example.com", and "engineering.example.com". Due to problems with abusive mail from a competitor's mail server at 192.168.5.11, that server's IP address is explicitly blocked. This company relies on e-mail to conduct business, and only wants to Tag mail that is probably spam, so that there is no possiblity of mail getting dropped. JSpamFilter is running on the same Windows 2000 machine as the mail server, which has been reconfigured to listen on port 26.

logDir=c:\JSpamFilter
license=Example Corp:1234567890a
defaultAction=tag
ListenPort=25
ListenIP=all
TalkPort=26
TalkIP=all
dnsbl=relays.ordb.org bl.spamcop.net
servername=example.com
LocalDomainFile=/etc/named.boot
LocalDomainFileRefresh=60
allowrelay=10.x
blockrelay=192.168.5.11


This could be handy.

Scenario Two: Separate JSpamFilter machine

In this scenario, JSpamFilter is loaded on a Linux-based machine that doubles as the DNS server, and the Firewall blocks all inbound TCP connection attempts to the Mail Server. The DNS name "mail.example.com" points to the JSpamFilter machine's IP address, and the DNS name for the Mail Server is "relay.example.com". This company wants to Block connections from servers listed in the Open Relay database "relays.ordb.org", and wants to Tag mail from servers in SpamCop's DNSBL. Since users are not connecting to the JSpamFilter machine to send mail, no IP address whitelist is necessary. Since they host the DNS for all of the domains that they handle mail for, they read the Local Domain list from /etc/named.boot, and check for updates every minute.

Sample configuration file:

logDir=/var/adm/jspamfilter/
license=Example Corp:1234567890a
defaultAction=tag
ListenPort=25
ListenIP=all
TalkPort=25
TalkIP=relay.example.com
dnsbl=relays.ordb.org! bl.spamcop.net
servername=example.com
localdomainlist=example.com mail.example.com


This could be handy.

Scenario Three: Aggressive Filtering

In this scenario, JSpamFilter is loaded on the same NT machine as the mail server. The server's admin is fed up with SPAM and has configured her server to block any mail from servers on any of three different DNSBLs. Additionally, several blocks of IP addresses owned by ISPs she considers to be SPAM-friendly are explicitly blocked.

license=Example Corp:1234567890a
defaultAction=block
logDir=/var/adm/jspamfilter/
ListenPort=25
ListenIP=all
TalkPort=26
TalkIP=all
dnsbl=relays.ordb.org bl.spamcop.net sbl.spamhaus.org
servername=example.com
localdomainlist=example.com mail.example.com
blockrelay=172.16.45.x 172.29.110.x 172.29.111.x 172.29.112.x 172.29.113.x


This could be handy.

Scenario Four: Refuse Connections from DNSBL-Listed Servers and Send All Other Suspicious Mail to a Dead Letter Mailbox:

In this scenario, we use a standard netowrk configuration as in the above examples. Here we create a Dead Letter mail box used to collect all mail that is not blocked outright (i.e., the connection refused). We've left out all of the parameters except the ones important for this example.

defaultAction=block
dnsbl=relays.ordb.org* bl.spamcop.net* sbl.spamhaus.org*
FilterTagThreshold=100
FilterBlockThreshold=100
deadLetterBox=example@example.com 

We use "100" and "example@example.com" as examples, you would use the threshold value that works for you and the full email address of your Dead Letter mail box. In this situation, any attempted mail connection coming from the DNSBLs listed will be refused and all mail that scores a value of 100 or higher will be routed to the Dead Letter mail box.




































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